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Home treadmills come in a wide range of options. There are budget models, manual machines, and foldable options, most of which our product testers have firsthand experience with. But with financing options increasingly available, more and more people are looking for the best high-end treadmills. 

There isn’t a single definition for what makes a treadmill “high-end,” but usually it’s some combination of advanced technology, a powerful motor, a smooth belt, and a sturdy frame that doesn’t shake even at the highest speeds.

Yes, these are expensive treadmills—some costing upwards of $4,000—but if you’re looking for one of the best treadmills for a home gym that’s built to last and will help you reach your fitness goals, they’re worth the upfront investment. In this guide, we’ll go through our top seven picks, highlighting both the pros and cons to help you make a decision about which model will work best for you. 

We’ve Had Our Feet on the Best

At Garage Gym Reviews, we’ve personally run (and walked) hundreds of miles on nearly 50 different treadmills. Our goal is to provide an unbiased, expert opinion on everything from setup to performance and, eventually, longevity to help you make a decision that works best for you.

Our lineup of expert product testers includes certified personal trainers, certified Crossfit Level 1 Trainers, marathon runners, and nutrition experts. Not only do we have a personal interest in exercise equipment, it’s our professional mission to find the best of the best. We utilize our fitness equipment testing methodology to rate treadmills on many categories, including:

  • Footprint and portability
  • Tech capabilities
  • Adjustability and ergonomics
  • Durability

Based on all of this we’ve curated our list of the best high-end treadmills below. Let’s dive in.

Best High-End Treadmills

Best High-End Treadmill Overall: NordicTrack Commercial 1750

Good for: All types of workouts and anyone looking for a high-quality machine from a reputable manufacturer

Best High-End Treadmill

NordicTrack Commercial 1750

GGR Score: 4.5 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • Spacious running deck
  • Compatible with iFIT
  • 14-inch touchscreen
  • Incline and decline training
  • Financing available

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Compatible with iFIT
  • 3.5 CHP motor
  • Free trial of iFIT subscription with purchase
  • Treadmill with incline and decline training
  • Foldable to save space (EasyLift Assist)
  • Run that feels similar to road running
  • Financing options available through NordicTrack
  • Generous speed range
  • Wide running deck
  • Cooling fan

Cons

  • Big footprint
  • Heavy and not the easiest to move
  • Price is around $2,000
  • Warranty is voided if the treadmill is used/stored in a garage

Bottom Line

If you’re looking to add a workhorse of a treadmill to your home gym, we recommend the NordicTrack Commercial 1750.

For a respectable price, the NordicTrack Commercial 1750 is loaded with features, making it one of the best-value high-end treadmills. We rated it a 5 out of 5 for value, and you’ll see why here.

The 1750 is ergonomically designed with a roomy 22-inch-by-60-inch running belt that sits lower than the previous version for an easier transition on and off the machine. There’s a generous incline and decline range of -3% to 15%, so you can simulate outdoor running workouts and/or target different muscle groups than you would running on a flat or elevated surface.

This treadmill is also equipped with AutoAdjust technology, so your trainer can control the incline and the speed (which tops out at 12 miles per hour) remotely when you’re doing instructor-led workouts via iFIT.

An image of a woman walking on the NordicTrack 1750, one of the best high-end treadmills

If you buy the treadmill directly from NordicTrack, you’ll get a free 30-day membership to the fitness app, which includes both on-demand classes and live workouts, as well as studio classes. Coop especially enjoys the various walking and running programs that take you all over the country, since you get immersed in the scenery and it serves as a welcome distraction from a tough workout. Programming gets a 5 out of 5 from us.

For better viewing, the revamped 14-inch touchscreen on the 1750 is tiltable and pivotable, so you can get the right angle when running, or the ability to turn it when you’re doing work off the treadmill. Lindsay Scheele, lead reviewer of GGR Everything, has spent a fair amount of time on the 1750 and says that the touchscreen is super intuitive, the Bluetooth works well, and it’s a great experience overall. We give it a 4.5-out-of 5-rating for technology capabilities.

There are some downsides, though. For one, storing this treadmill in your garage voids the warranty—it needs to be in a climate-controlled space for coverage. It’s also large, heavy and bulky, which isn’t exclusive to this model, for the record; you’ll see this common theme with most high-end treadmills. That said, we rated the 1750 a 3.5 out of 5 for footprint and portability.

Read our full NordicTrack Commercial 1750 treadmill review for all the details.

Footprint81.25” L x 39.25” W x 62.75” H
Tread Belt22” x 60”
Weight Capacity300 lbs
Motor3.5 CHP
Warranty10-year frame, 2-year parts, 1-year labor

Best High-End Treadmill for Running: ProForm Pro 9000

Good for: Runners, who do regular incline/decline training, who are looking for a sturdy machine

Best High-End Treadmill for Running

ProForm Pro 9000

GGR Score: 4.5 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • Compatible with iFIT
  • Powerful motor
  • Foldable treadmill
  • Large 22-inch HD displays
  • Hands-free incline/speed adjustments

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Large 22-inch display
  • Compatible with iFIT
  • Incline and decline training available
  • Cushioned deck
  • Fan and water bottle holder
  • Bluetooth speakers

Cons

  • Priced around $2,300
  • iFIT subscription is an additional cost
  • Heavy machine with a big footprint
  • You cannot store or use this treadmill in your garage without voiding the warranty

Bottom Line

The ProForm Pro 9000 is a powerful, pricey treadmill great for those who want interactive programming from a reliable machine.

If you’re going to be using your treadmill primarily for running, you need a machine that has a powerful continuous motor and a cushioned belt with extra shock absorption to take some of the pressure off your joints. 

The ProForm Pro 9000 has a 3.6 CHP motor that’s ideal for high-volume runners, and one of our testers, GGR Senior Director of Content Kate Meier, says it feels really stable in use. “There was little to no play even when I was sprinting,” she says. Because of this, we rate the durability as a 5 out of 5.

The 20-inch-by-60-inch deck is built with the brand’s ReBound Pro cushioning, which lessens impact on landing so you can run faster and longer with less muscle and joint fatigue, and the Pro 9000 offers a 12 mph max speed along with a -3% to 12% decline to incline range. We give the Pro 9000 a 5 out of 5 in the adjustability and ergonomics category because of all of these factors.

woman-standing-on-proform-9000

“Even at a full sprint, I could feel the benefits of the cushioning under the tread belt and it made my runs a lot more comfortable and enjoyable,” says Coop, GGR founder and another tester.

Of course, since it’s a high-end treadmill, it comes with advanced technology like a 22-inch HD touchscreen, Bluetooth compatibility, and access to all the streaming services (separate subscriptions required). 

Because ProForm is owned by the same parent company as NordicTrack—Icon Health & Fitness—you also get access to iFIT, and this ‘mill is compatible with AutoAdjust. iFIT is free for 30 days if you buy directly from the brand’s site, but will cost you $39 per month for a family membership afterward. As you’ll see in our iFIT reviews, we really like iFIT programming and thus the Pro 9000 gets a 5 out of 5 in the programming category.

Read more about our experience with this machine in our ProForm Pro 9000 treadmill review.

Footprint77.3” L x 35.3” W x 59.6” H
Tread Belt20” x 60”
Weight Capacity300 lbs
Motor3.6 CHP
Warranty10-year frame, 2-year parts, 1-year labor

Best High-End Manual Treadmill: AssaultRunner Elite

Good for: People looking for a non-motorized high-end treadmill

Best High-End Manual Treadmill

AssaultRunner Elite

GGR Score: 4 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

Introducing the most powerful and personalized manual treadmill ever created. The brand new AssaultRunner Elite is expertly crafted to meet the specific needs of professional athletes, home gym users, and commercial owners alike.

AssaultRunner makes the most well-known manual treadmills in the industry, largely thanks to CrossFit. The AssaultRunner Elite is the upgraded version of the AssaultRunner Pro (formerly called the Assault Air Runner).

It doesn’t have the same technological bells and whistles as other high-end treadmills, like a touchscreen display—we rate it a 3.5 out of 5 in the technology capabilities category—but its monitor is fairly impressive compared to other manual treadmills. 

It comes with nine built-in programs, including quick-start, competition mode, target heart rate, target time, target distance, target calories, custom intervals, 20/10, and 10/20 intervals. It’s also compatible with Bluetooth and ANT, so you can connect it to a third-party app like Zwift via a tablet if you want to turn it into more of a smart machine.

An image of a man running on the AssaultRunner Elite treadmill

The real beauty of this machine lies in its construction. It has a 62-inch curved belt that makes for a more ergonomic run and accommodates a longer stride than most other treadmills. This makes running a breeze for users even over six feet. The belt is also really smooth and spins quickly, which is especially great if you like doing sprinting intervals, according to Coop. 

It has an internal powder-coated steel frame that makes for a super sturdy run, although the plastic on the sides of the machine is prone to cracking—we docked one point in durability for a 4 out of 5 because of this. If this did happen it wouldn’t affect the functionality, it’s just more of a visual bummer.

Since the AssaultRunner Elite is user-powered, you don’t have to plug it in, which means you’re not tied to an outlet and can put it in the middle of your garage if you wanted to. This is a positive for portability, but this machine doesn’t fold up like a typical treadmill and is pretty heavy, so we rated the AssaultRunner Elite a 3.5 out of 5 in footprint and portability.

Read our AssaultRunner Elite review for more information.

Footprint69.9” L x 31.7” W x 64.4” H
Tread Belt17” W x 62” L
Weight Capacity400 lbs
MotorN/A
WarrantyLifetime belt, 10-year frame, 2-year parts, 1-year labor

RELATED: AssaultRunner Elite treadmill review

Best High-End Treadmill for Heavier Runners: Sole TT8

Good for: People who want or need a treadmill with a very powerful motor and high user weight capacity

Best High-End Treadmill for Heavier People

Sole TT8 Treadmill

GGR Score: 3.72 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • High-end treadmill with a spacious running belt
  • Incline and decline grades 
  • 2-ply cushioned belt
  • 4.0 HP motor 
  • 400 lb weight capacity

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • High user weight capacity (400 lbs)
  • Powerful motor (4.0 horsepower)
  • Can do incline and decline training (-6% to 15% range)
  • Spacious 22” by 60” running surface

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Large footprint
  • Heavy, not easy to move
  • No touchscreen

Bottom Line

The Sole TT8 is a high-end treadmill with many great features you’d expect to see on a treadmill that costs around $2,900. It offers both incline and decline levels, which is something we don't see on treadmills very often.

The best treadmills for heavy people will have a spacious belt, powerful motor, and proven durability, all of which the Sole TT8 possesses. It has a powerful 4.0 HP motor and an impressive 400-pound weight capacity—25 to 100 pounds more than others on this list! We rate the durability of this machine a solid 4 out of 5—GGR Everything lead reviewer and CPT Lindsay Scheele said there was a bit of play when she was sprinting, but overall it feels sturdy.

The Sole TT8 has a generous incline/decline range of -6% to 15% so you can simulate outdoor walking with your treadmill workouts, plus a maximum speed of 12 mph.

The 16-inch touchscreen isn’t as impressive as comparable motorized treadmills—it can connect via Bluetooth to a compatible device to sync your workouts, but you can’t run apps like iFIT or Peloton on it, or even Sole’s own programming app. Because of this, we rate the technology capabilities as a 3 out of 5.

RELATED: How to Choose Running Shoes

At 22 inches by 60 inches, the shock-absorbing running surface is spacious and can accommodate various stride lengths. It’s made with a two-ply belt that’s meant to mimic the soles on running shoes; it absorbs impact so you feel less pressure on your joints if you decide to pick up the pace from a walk to a jog or run. 

There are other comfort and convenience features, too, like a cooling fan, a USB charging port, and Bluetooth-compatible speakers. It also has heart rate monitoring, but you’ll have to bring your own chest strap as it doesn’t come with one. We rate conveniences as a 4 out of 5.

Read our Sole TT8 review for a deeper dive.

Footprint82” L x 36” W x 58” H
Tread Belt22” x 60”
Weight Capacity400 lbs
Motor4.0 HP
WarrantyLifetime frame, motor, and deck; 5-year electronics; 2-year labor

Best High-End Incline Treadmill: NordicTrack Commercial X32i

Good for: Those looking to splurge on a treadmill with an impressive incline range

Best High-End Incline Treadmill

NordicTrack Commercial X32i Treadmill

GGR Score: 4.25 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • Decline and larger incline than most other treadmills
  • 32” touchscreen
  • Powerful motor 
  • Commercial-grade machine
  • Oversized running surface

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • -32” HD touchscreen
  • -Heart rate chest strap included
  • -6% Decline to 40% Incline
  • -Quiet when in use
  • -Extremely powerful 4.25 CHP motor

Cons

  • -Doesn’t fold
  • -Expensive
  • -Heavy and hard to move

Bottom Line

While this treadmill is definitely on the expensive side, the many added features makes for a high-quality piece of equipment.

The NordicTrack Commercial X32i is indeed a high-end machine, but it has a lot going for it. For starters, it offers a 40% incline and -6% decline, which is just insane. GGR Head of Content Nicole Davis tried this machine and said she had to hold on hard when the incline was all the way up. “This would be a great tool for those who are training to hike,” Nicole says. 

NordicTrack Commercial X32i Treadmill incline in use

The touchscreen is a whopping 32 inches, which feels huge according to Nicole. “It’s like watching a TV up close,” she says. The screen also shook a bit when Nicole was running at higher speeds, she thinks because of its sheer size. However, iFIT workouts were cool to experience on this large screen, so we gave the tech capabilities a 5 out of 5 overall.  

touching screen NordicTrack Commercial X32i Treadmill

One downside to this machine is its size, leading us to rate it a 2 out of 5 in portability and footprint. It weighs 462 pounds, and while it has wheels, it definitely requires two people to move it, and it wouldn’t fit in a small space. With a weight capacity of 400 pounds and a 4.25 CHP motor, it gets a 5 out of 5 in durability, though. 

A 12 MPH max speed would be more than enough for most users, plus the super cushioned deck makes for a smooth ride. And speaking of the deck, it’s a whopping 22 inches wide by 65 inches long—this would be comfortable for tall and big users alike. 

The Commercial X32i is going for about $4,500, and while yes, that is a splurge, for what you get, it might be worth it. We give this machine a 4.5 out of 5 for value as we just think what it provides is notable.

Read our full NordicTrack X32i review for more.

Footprint76.5” L x 40” W x 73” H
Tread belt22” W x 65” L
Weight capacity400 pounds 
Motor4.25 CHP
Warranty10-year frame, 2-year parts, 1-year labor

Best High-End Treadmill That Doesn’t Require an App: Horizon 7.8AT Studio Tread

Good for: People who want the option to choose their own fitness app (or none at all)

High-End Treadmill With No Subscription

Horizon 7.8 AT Treadmill

GGR Score: 4.42 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • 60-inch running deck
  • Deck cushioning
  • 375 maximum user weight limit
  • Powerful rapid sync motor
  • Top speeds of 12 mph
  • Incline training up to 15%
  • Quick-dial controls
  • Compatible with popular fitness apps

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Stream various fitness platforms
  • No subscription required
  • Dial controls are great for interval training
  • Larger running deck
  • Highly-responsive motor
  • Financing options
  • Lifetime warranty on frame and motor

Cons

  • Weighs 330 lbs, so not easily portable
  • While you can sync with external apps, the 7.8 AT requires a smart device to provide touchscreen content, videos or online classes

Bottom Line

The Horizon 7.8 AT is an impressive treadmill suited for serious runners and newbies alike. With access to popular fitness apps and no required subscription, it may be attractive to those who don’t want to be locked into one platform.

Many high-end treadmills require a monthly subscription to the brand’s own fitness app for full access to all the features. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it’s definitely something you have to consider as part of your budget. If you don’t want a separate subscription, the Horizon Fitness 7.8AT Studio Tread is the best choice for you. 

It includes a Bluetooth chest strap that can link up with third-party fitness apps like Zwift and Peloton. This gives you the same immersive experience as some of the others, but you’re not limited to a specific platform. If you choose not to set up a fitness app, you’ll still get access to several preset workouts, including but not limited to, 5K, Fat Burn, Hill Climb, and Sprint, on the 9.3-inch digital display. While the tech capabilities are lacking in the screen, because you can sync with plenty of apps, we rate this category as a 3.5 out of 5.

Man running on Horizon 7.4 Studio Tread
Image of the 7.4, which we have tested

This machine also has a spacious 22-inch-by-60-inch cushioned running deck and a 4 HP rapid sync motor. This responsive motor is ideal for interval training since it responds to changes more quickly and won’t lag or delay when you change speed and/or incline levels. Speaking of which, speed maxes out at 12 mph and the incline range goes up to 15%. We give adjustability and ergonomics a 4.5 out of 5 on this machine.

Lastly, the 7.8 AT comes with your basic convenience and comfort features, like a water bottle holder, a fan, a media tray, and a tablet holder so you can stream workouts from any of the compatible apps, earning it a 4.5 out of 5 in the conveniences category.

Read our Horizon 7.8 AT treadmill review for more information.

Footprint76” L x 37” W x 64” H
Tread Belt22” x 60”
Weight Capacity375 lbs
Motor4 HP
WarrantyLifetime frame and motor; 5-year parts; 2-year labor

Best High-End Treadmill for Virtual Classes: Peloton Tread

Good for: People looking for a wide range of live and on-demand workout classes

High-End Treadmill for Studio Classes

Peloton Tread

GGR Score: 3.74 starstarstarstarstar

Product Highlights

  • Powerful 3.0 CHP motor
  • Carbon steel construction
  • Top speeds of 12.5 MPH
  • 23.5" HD touchscreen display
  • Incline training
  • Non-folding
  • Live and on-demand classes

Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Interactive, responsive HD touchscreen display
  • Access to thousands of workouts via Peloton
  • Bluetooth connectivity
  • Front speakers and rear woofers for great sound
  • Big range of speed and incline
  • Carbon steel frame
  • Intuitive controls
  • Red line centered on running deck ensures good running mechanics
  • Sleek design
  • Improved safety features: Tread lock, emergency stop button, stop-sensor technology in belt and a safety key

Cons

  • Disappointing warranty
  • No decline
  • No pre-programmed workout so need to purchase membership to Peloton
  • Expensive
  • Heavy
  • Smaller console
  • Minimal cushioning
  • No cooling fans (not a deal breaker but it would be nice)
  • Smaller running deck compared to similarly priced treadmills

Bottom Line

After several recalls back in 2021, Peloton recently released this new treadmill, the Peloton Tread, with improved safety measures. Perhaps best known for its wide range of live and on-demand classes, the Peloton Tread is a fantastic way to train indoors and stay motivated.  The easy-to-use, interactive touchscreen provides access to a library of workouts and leaderboards that truly brings training to a new level.Powered by a 3.0 horsepower motor, the Tread reaches speeds up to 12.5 mph and inclines up to 12.5%; impressive numbers by any standard. Constructed from carbon steel, the Tread has a sleek, compact design that is as sturdy as it is attractive. While the price tag is steep, it could be a worthwhile investment for your home gym if it fits your budget.

The Peloton Tread likely needs no introduction, but if you’re looking for a machine that’s optimized for virtual classes, this is it. Not only can you access running and walking programs, you can follow along with strength training and bootcamp classes via the Peloton app, one of the best dynamic programming apps available today. Peloton’s app also has yoga, stretching, meditation, pilates, and barre programs. We rate both programming and tech capabilities a 5 out of 5 on this machine.

woman using peloton tread

While you won’t be doing these workouts on the machine, you can follow along with them from the enormous 23.8-inch touchscreen. Unlike the Peloton Bike+’s screen, this one doesn’t fully rotate, but it does tilt up to 50 degrees. There are front- and rear-facing speakers so you can clearly hear your instructor even if you’re not directly in front of the screen. 

Even without the studio workouts, which unsurprisingly come with an extra monthly subscription fee ($44 per month), the Tread is a solid machine with decent specs. It has a 3.0 HP motor, which is on the lower end for a machine at this price point, but it can still handle higher speeds without any major issues. The machine weighs 290 pounds and doesn’t fold, so footprint and portability only get a 2 out of 5, but durability gets a 4 out of 5. Our tester, friend of GGR Dawn Chapman, says she’s had several treadmills over the years and this is the sturdiest one she’s owned by far.

The 59-inch running belt on the Tread is a few inches shorter than most of the others, but will still comfortably accommodate most stride lengths. The Tread tops out at a 12.5% incline—it doesn’t decline—and has a max speed of 12.5 miles per hour. There are speed and incline knobs integrated into the frame handles that make it easy to change both without breaking your stride.

Read our Peloton Tread review for our full thoughts.

Footprint68” L x 33” W x 62” H
Tread Belt20” x 59”
Weight Capacity300 pounds
Motor3.0 HP
Warranty5-year frame, 3-year motor and belt, 1-year touchscreen and components

Other Treadmills We Tried and Researched

The following treadmills didn’t officially make our list, but they’re still high-quality machines from reputable manufacturers. We’ve tested many of them. The ones we haven’t have been thoroughly researched and come with many of the same features as our favorite models.

woman using JRNY app on Bowflex Treadmill 10

Bowflex Treadmill 10: The Bowflex Treadmill 10 ($1,999) is the entry-level model from Bowflex, but it’s still a high-end treadmill by most standards. It maxes out at 12 miles per hour and has a 10-inch HD touchscreen, decline and incline settings, and Bluetooth connectivity. It must be connected to the JRNY fitness streaming app to access the full range of features. (Read our full Bowflex T10 review.)

An image of a woman running on a NordicTrack X22i Treadmill

NordicTrack Commercial x22i: Another high-end option from NordicTrack, the Commercial x22i has a max incline grade of 40%. Since most max out at 15%, that’s one of the biggest standouts of this machine. It also has a large, 22-inch HD touch and iFIT compatibility with the option for remote trainer control. Read our full NordicTrack X22i review for more.

AssaultRunner Pro: This model is the flagship AssaultRunner treadmill. Coop thinks it’s a great machine (it was named the best manual treadmill overall); it’s just not as heavy-duty as the AssaultRunner Elite. Nevertheless, this one is a slightly more affordable way to get one in your home gym. Read our full AssaultRunner Pro review to get more details.

Woman jogging on the Sole ST90 treadmill

Sole ST90: A slightly upgraded version of the Sole TT8, this treadmill has a slat belt design similar to the AssaultRunner machines. It features a 10.1-inch LCD touchscreen, 15 levels of incline, and a top speed of 12.5 miles per hour. We think the TT8 is a better option for most people, but you can read our full Sole ST90 review for more.

How We Picked and Tested

All the treadmills on this list were tested and handpicked by Coop and the Garage Gym Reviews team. They were used multiple times for a variety of workouts, from casual walking to interval training to running at max speed. In addition to making note of the machine’s performance (stability, smoothness of the belt, etc), these are the other variables that were factored in:

  • Ease of setup
  • Compatible apps
  • Pre-programmed/included workouts
  • Technology
  • Incline/decline range
  • Dimensions/overall footprint
  • Durability
  • Price
  • Warranty
  • Extra features

With high-end treadmills, the team pays special attention to the technology and durability, since these are two major things that set these more-expensive machines apart. 

  • What type of technology is included with the treadmill? Does it have built-in workouts?
  • What’s the additional cost for the compatible fitness app?
  • Is it easy to use (touchscreen, conveniently placed buttons, etc.)? Does it glitch?

Durability is best judged over time, but the type of frame and the strength of the motor give major clues what the treadmill’s potential lifespan will be, as do the stability and the performance of the belt.

Benefits of High-End Treadmills

Treadmills come in a huge range of price points, some as low as a few hundred dollars. So why splurge on a high-end treadmill? These are some of the biggest reasons.

Technology

High-end treadmills are all about the technology. They typically have larger and higher-quality screens and access to more training programs (often via subscription-based apps). Many also give you access to streaming services, like Netflix or Hulu, so you catch up on the latest binge-worthy show while you’re getting your cardio in.

Comfort

In general, high-end treadmills have wider running decks with more cushioning, which makes for a more comfortable workout. They also have additional comfort features like water bottle holders, fans, and media shelves.

Longevity

High-end treadmills aren’t just about fancy technology or bigger belts (although they have these things, too), they have sturdy frames and heavy-duty motors that are built to take the beating that can come with regular use. 

When it comes to longevity, “You get what you pay for,” says Coop. “In general, the more money you can invest in a treadmill, the longer it will last.

Stability

Sturdy frames don’t just contribute to a machine’s longevity, they also ensure stability even at higher speeds. This is less important for casual walkers, but if you like to run or do HIIT training, you want a machine that’s not going to shake or have a jumpy belt. 

Buying Guide:What to Look for in a High-End Treadmill

So what is it that makes a treadmill high-end? And how do you choose the one for you? Here’s what the testing team at Garage Gym Reviews thinks you should look for.

Technology

Advanced technology is one of the major things that sets high-end treadmills apart from budget models. Most elite treadmills come pretty stacked, but here are some things to consider:

  • Screen size and functionality
  • Bluetooth and/or Wi-Fi capabilities
  • Customized user profiles
  • Heart rate monitoring
  • Streaming services

Training Options

Most high-end treadmills are compatible with the brand’s corresponding fitness app. For NordicTrack and ProForm, it’s iFIT. Bowflex uses JRNY, and the Peloton Tread uses the Peloton app. When choosing a high-end treadmill, consider what you get with each program. Are there live and on-demand workouts? How often do new workouts drop? Does it offer more than just running workouts?

You also want to think about how the treadmill will function without a subscription. NordicTrack and Bowflex treadmills will let you operate in manual mode only, but the Horizon Fitness 7.8 AT Studio Tread offers pre-programmed workouts without a subscription. 

Space

High-end treadmills are big. Some of them are folding treadmills and some aren’t. But either way, you want to make sure you have the space for them. Carefully measure the room you plan to put the treadmill in, considering the overhead clearance too. 

Other Conveniences

Other conveniences also sweeten the deal a little bit. Here are some things you can look for:

  • Media shelf
  • USB charging port
  • Cooling fan
  • Cushioned deck for shock absorption
  • Storage tray

Budget 

You can always check for the latest treadmill coupons, but you’re obviously going to have to shell out more cash for a high-end treadmill than you would a budget model. Don’t just look at the retail price of the treadmill; factor in the monthly or annual cost of the subscription service if you’re planning to use the machine to its full capabilities. 

RELATED: History of Treadmills

Best High-End Treadmills FAQs

How much is a high-end treadmill?

The price of a high-end treadmill varies based on the features and the strength of the motor. The Garage Gym Reviews testing team’s top picks have a price range of $1,799 to $4,500, but most fall around $2,000 to $2,500.

Is it worth buying a high-end treadmill?

If you’re looking for a quality treadmill that’s built to last, it’s definitely worth spending the extra money. While the initial price tag is higher, high-end treadmills have sturdier frames and more reliable motors than budget models. Because of this, you’ll likely get many more years of use before you’d have to replace it. While the price point doesn’t automatically mean it’s the best treadmill, Coop is firm in the belief that you get what you pay for when it comes to gym equipment.

What is the best commercial treadmill for home use?

In our opinion, the NordicTrack Commercial 1750 is the best commercial treadmill for home use. It has a 3.5 CHP motor, an incline range of -3% to 15%, and an enormous touchscreen display that allows you to immerse yourself in iFIT workouts. The treadmill belt is also spacious and smooth at all speeds, so it’s ideal for everything from walking to interval sprints.

Further reading

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